Jan 292010
 

The need for a solid approach to email discovery is needed.   Recent legal changes now make it necessary to really review how one approaches the backup and retention of email.   The monitoring, archiving, and forensics needed can confound and overwhelm IT staffs that are already handling day to day projects.

Can you stand in front of a judge and say confidently that all data matches to corporate policy? Do you know your policy?   If you want to double check your position on Electronic Discovery for your organization, review this recorded CIO Exec Series Podcast from this week. Some of the following discussions are captured in this podcast:

What are the legal concerns CIOs have?
What is ’sustained effort?’
Who else has an aggressive email retention policy?
In the cloud archiving options.
Are you a Lotus Notes shop or Microsoft?
What about laptops?
What can you do with Group Policy? What can’t you do?

I hope you enjoy.  Let me know your thoughts.

Bill

Jan 222010
 

I have been on the road now interviewing many of the CIOs in the CIO Exec Series Group to develop the content for the 2010 year.   We have the eDiscovery Virtual Roundtable next week and this blog post is an interesting discussion I had with this CIO friend of mine who had to dive deeply into the eDiscovery field over the past 18 months.   He actually used the Forensics for Dummies book. For a small to medium business CIO with 300 – 1,000 employees this may be all that is needed for you.

Here is a quick tool kit of products that he cobbled together to assist his attorneys in eDiscovery efforts. 

He uses the Barracuda product for email archiving. 

For OCR functionality and Indexing he uses a product called ABBYY that you can buy for less than $400 through CDW.  

He also uses a product made by Cleverbridge to check all documents for encrypted files since you can’t OCR encrypted files.  This product scans and finds all of these documents and removes their passwords on over 300 file types.

For the final Forensics part of the toolkit, he uses a fascinating product called Encase made by Guidance Software. They are the leading in the world for Digital Investigation software. You can check them out HERE.

He added that you will need lots of computing horsepower so make sure you build a powerful server to do the crunching.   eDiscovery for less than $10 grand – not bad.

This CIO wants to remain anonymous, but I want to thank him for his contribution here.   If you have comments, please post them below.